Taken A Tour At Anchor Brewing Company

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"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy."
--
Benjamin Franklin

Every weekday,
Anchor Brewing Company offers public tours at 10am and 1pm. These tours are by appointment and booked for months. I had to call and make this reservation several weeks in advance. One of the best things about this is that it's totally free of charge.

Anchor Brewing Company is part of San Francisco history. It was founded in 1896 by two men from Germany and is well known for it's steam beer, very effervescent beer made by brewing lager yeasts at warm fermentation temperatures.

J and I started our tour in a nice bar area that acts as their lobby. We were very early because I thought the tour was at 9am, but it's actually at 10. This area has a full bar, a case with some cool relics and a guestbook.
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There were also celebrity photos on the walls.
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After a fairly meaty history of the Anchor Brewing Comapny, our tour guide showed us the ingredients used to make beer.
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She also talked about the numerous varieties Anchor produces.
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Our tour guide did a great job describing the brewing process from station to station. She talked pretty fast and it definitely was loud in some sections.
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This is the main brew room. Sadly, we were not allowed to take photos beyond this room
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We also got to head to the bottling room, which I thought was really cool. It was awesome seeing tons of bottles flying around the room getting cleaned, labeled and boxed.

Our tour finished up with a look at some of the old school tools used to make beer. There had hops and barley out on display.
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I enjoyed the tour. I want to do it again. We had to run off, so unfortunately, J didn't get to get the free sample of beer. I definitely left with a greater appreciation of how beer is made as well as the rich history a small brewery like Anchor has kept alive for over a century.
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